Virtually ISBE: Voices of Agri-Entrepreneurship, 25th February, 3pm-5pm, Online

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This is the first online ISBE REN / Rural Track seminar of the year and is hosted by our colleagues at Royal Agricultural University. In this seminar, we hear from researchers and practitioners interested in agri-entrepreneurship. In this 2-hour session, colleagues will present 2 papers, followed by a practitioner case.

To register please click here.

Farm Women: An overview of the literature in a UK context

Paper 1: Farm Women: An overview of the literature in a UK context. Robert Smith (Presenting) Louise Manning Royal Agricultural University, Cirencester, United Kingdom Gerard McElwee University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, United Kingdom

Farming is a heavily gendered environment. In this review paper we introduce, theorise and discuss the triadic research themes of ‘Women Farmers’, ’Farmers Wives’ and ‘Farm Women’ as an under researched social status group and resource. The term farm women include ‘farmers’ mothers and daughters’ and the ‘wives and daughters of farm workers’ but also ‘migrant workers’ whom are under-represented in the literature. Increasingly, women make up a considerable proportion of agricultural students and the land-based workforce. Such women and particularly women farmers have a marginalised voice in existing formal discourse. Indeed, little is written about women farmers in either the rural entrepreneurship literature or the entrepreneurship and gender literature with the limited exception of asking questions and attempting to answer questions about the role of household and off farm work. There are studies in the agricultural literature but there is an identifiable research gap relating to what they do and how they do it and more importantly their official status. Historically farm women in the wider context often received limited or no formal management skill or training or an agricultural education, but this is changing. Consequentially, this educational transition is of interest within the wider context of women being considered as an under recognised and under-valued resource worthy of further research.

The COVID-19 Pandemic and its Effects on The Entrepreneurial Cider Industry in Rural Quebec

Paper 2: The COVID-19 Pandemic and its Effects on The Entrepreneurial Cider Industry in Rural Quebec Martin Cloutier (Presenting) and Laurent Renard, University of Quebec at Montreal, Canada

The health crisis provoked by the COVID-19 pandemic has created an unprecedented situation for actors of the cider ecosystem in Quebec (Canada). Cidermakers have suddenly discovered, on the down side, new business risks associated with the distribution channels of their products, especially for the ones dependent upon short or locally based distribution channels and invested in agritourism, as well as on the up side, new individual and collective resilience capabilities. The cider ecosystem in Quebec includes about 80 entrepreneurs who are small production permit holders. Seventy percent of cidermakers are “artisans” who produce up to 5,000 litres of cider per year and have on average 1,5 employees. This ecosystem is mainly characterised by a constantly renewing entrepreneurship made up of microenterprises, very small and small enterprises of fewer than 50 employees. The cider ecosystem has a dynamic of coopetition among its actors (Cloutier et al., 2017; Cloutier, Renard and Arcand, 2019). The literature that has examined the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on organisations quickly underscores its consequences on the dynamics of coopetition within members of trade associations (Crick and Crick, 2020). Indeed, the health crisis has provoked endogenous repercussions in the population, economic and social dimensions, in particular those related to agritourism in which the cider ecosystem is strongly anchored. But, in terms of coopetition, it is also necessary to focus on the dimensions related to resources and relational capital, on the one hand, as well as the building of individual and collective resilience capabilities, on the other hand. Regarding these notions, there is little definitive theoretical knowledge in entrepreneurship and they are more difficult to research outside a crisis.

Practitioner case study: Farm491 – an innovative business support approach making a difference for agri-tech innovation, Dr Inge Hill, Royal Agricultural University, in conversation with Sarah Carr, Farm491

Programme (Subject to Change)

15.00 – 15.10 ISBE REN Introduction (Newbery)
15.10 – 15.40 Paper 1 Farm Women: An overview of the literature in a UK context. Robert Smith (Presenting) Louise Manning Royal Agricultural University, Cirencester, United Kingdom Gerard McElwee University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, United Kingdom
15.40 – 16.10 Paper 2 The COVID-19 Pandemic and its Effects on The Entrepreneurial Cider Industry in Rural Quebec Martin Cloutier (Presenting) and Laurent Renard, University of Quebec at Montreal, Canada
16.10 – 16.40 Farm491 – an innovative business support approach making a difference for agri-tech innovation, Dr Inge Hill, Royal Agricultural University, in conversation with Sarah Carr, Farm491
16.40 – 16.55 Roundup, NICRE & AoB (Bosworth / Hill)
16.55 – 17.00 Close by ISBE REN (Bosworth)

Free for ISBE Members and £25 for non-members. (To check if your institution is an ISBE member please click here)

To register please click here.

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